Sign up on our Mailing List   Home Page  
 

 
Aloha Accents
Exclusively Featuring
DIETRICH VAREZ
"Hawaii's Prince of Prints" in BRONZE
Story Jewelry

"Wearable Art"
Free Shipping Today  Orders of +$100

| Pele Pendant | Hula Pendant | Canoe Pendant |
| Spearfishing / Freediver Pendant |
| Pele FreeForm Pendant |
 
 
About Pele                              BACK TO PELE PENDANT

Pele (pronounced [ PEL-lə), the Fire Goddess, is the goddess of fire, lightning, wind and volcanoes and the creator of the Hawaiian Islands. Often referred to as "Madame Pele" or "Tūtū Pele" as a sign of respect, she is a well-known deity within Hawaiian mythology, and is notable for her contemporary presence and cultural influence as an enduring figure from ancient Hawaii.[1]

Legends

There are several traditional legends associated with Pele in Hawaiian mythology. In addition to being recognized as the goddess of volcanoes, Pele is also known for her power, passion, jealousy, and capriciousness. She has numerous siblings, including Kāne Milohai, Kamohoaliʻi, Nāmaka and numerous sisters named Hiʻiaka, the most famous being Hiʻiakaikapoliopele (Hiʻiaka in the bosom of Pele). They are usually considered to be the offspring of Haumea. Pele's siblings include deities of various types of wind, rain, fire, ocean wave forms, and cloud forms. Her home is believed to be the fire pit called Halemaʻumaʻu crater, at the summit caldera of Kīlauea, one of the Earth's most active volcanoes; but her domain encompasses all volcanic activity on the Big Island of Hawaiʻi.[3]

Expulsion version

In one version of the story, Pele is the daughter of Kanehoalani and Haumea in the mystical land of Kuaihelani, a floating free land like Fata Morgana. Kuaihelani was in the region of Kahiki (Kukulu o Kahiki). She stays so close to her mother's fireplace with the fire-keeper Lono-makua. Her older sister Nā-maka-o-Kahaʻi, a sea goddess, fears that Pele's ambition would smother the home-land and drives Pele away. Kamohoali'i drives Pele south in a canoe called Honua-i-a-kea with her younger sister Hiʻiaka and with her brothers Kamohoaliʻi, Kanemilohai, Kaneapua, and arrives at the islets above Hawaii. There Kane-milo-hai is left on Mokupapapa, just a reef, to build it up in fitness for human residence. On Nihoa, 800 feet above the ocean she leaves Kane-apua after her visit to Lehua and crowning a wreath of kau-no'a. Pele feels sorry for her younger brother and picks him up again. Pele used the divining rod, Pa‘oa to pick a new home. A group of chants tells of a pursuit by Namakaokaha'i and Pele is torn apart. Her bones, KaiwioPele form a hill on Kahikinui, while her spirit escaped to the island of Hawaiʻi.[5]:157 (Pele & Hi'iaka A myth from Hawaii by Nathaniel B. Emerson)

Flood version

In another version, Pele comes from a land said to be "close to the clouds," with parents Kane-hoa-lani and Ka-hina-liʻi, and brothers Ka-moho-aliʻi and Kahuila-o-ka-lani. From her husband Wahieloa (also called Wahialoa) she has a daughter Laka and a son Menehune. Pele-kumu-honua entices her husband and Pele travels in search of him. The sea pours from her head over the land of Kanaloa (perhaps the island now known as Kahoʻolawe) and her brothers say:

O the sea, the great sea!
Forth bursts the sea:
Behold, it bursts on Kanaloa!

The sea floods the land, then recedes; this flooding is called Kai a Kahinalii ("The sea of Ka-hina-liʻi"), as Pele's connection to the sea was passed down from her mother Kahinalii.[5]:158[6][7]

Pele and Poliʻahu

Pele was considered to be a rival of the Hawaiian goddess of snow, Poliʻahu, and her sisters Lilinoe (a goddess of fine rain), Waiau (goddess of Lake Waiau), and Kahoupokane (a kapa maker whose kapa making activities create thunder, rain, and lightning). All except Kahoupokane reside on Mauna Kea. The kapa maker lives on Hualalai.

One myth tells that Poliʻahu had come from Mauna Kea with her friends to attend sled races down the grassy hills south of Hamakua. Pele came disguised as a beautiful stranger and was greeted by Poliʻahu. However, Pele became jealously enraged at the goddess of Mauna Kea. She opened the subterranean caverns of Mauna Kea and threw fire from them towards Poliʻahu, with the snow goddess fleeing towards the summit. Poliʻahu was finally able to grab her now-burning snow mantle and throw it over the mountain. Earthquakes shook the island as the snow mantle unfolded until it reached the fire fountains, chilling and hardening the lava. The rivers of lava were driven back to Mauna Loa and Kīlauea. Later battles also led to the defeat of Pele and confirmed the supremacy of the snow goddesses in the northern portion of the island and of Pele in the southern portion.[8]

Relatives

Pele's other prominent relatives are:
Hiʻiaka, spirit of the dance
Kā-moho-aliʻi, a shark god and the keeper of the water of life
Kaʻōhelo, a mortal sister
Kapo, a goddess of fertility
Ka-poho-i-kahi-ola, spirit of explosions
Kane-Hekili, spirit of the thunder (a hunchback)
Ke-ō-ahi-kama-kaua, the spirit of lava fountains (a hunchback)
Ke-ua-a-ke-pō, spirit of the rain and fire
Kane-hoa-lani, father and division with fire
Hina-alii, mother and takes different forms

Science

Pele's hair, a volcanic glass in strands
Several phenomena connected to volcanism have been named after her, including Pele's hair, Pele's tears, and Limu o Pele (Pele's seaweed).
A volcano on the Jovian moon Io is also named Pele.[17]

*Content courtesy of Wikipedia Creative Commons License


....BACK TO PELE JEWELRY

Sign Up on our Mailing List
Keep up to date with new designs and receive special discount offers and coupons

 
 
 
  CONTACT
INFORMATION
SHOPPING
NEWS
  Contact Us

 

Wholesale
About the Artists:
      Dietrich Varez
      Ken and Beate Arnopole

 
About Stories & Legends:
Pele     Hula   
Retail Locations

 

About Bronze & Copper
and how to take care of your wearable art.
NEWSLETTER / BLOG
Photo Gallery (coming soon)
MEDIA

Follow us  / Like Us:
  
         
         

Copyright 2017 - Varez Jewelry -  All rights reserved         Privacy Policy     Terms of Use